Long-term nitrogen addition modifies microbial composition and functions for slow carbon cycling and increased sequestration in tropical forest soil
Tian, Jing1,2; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.3; Lu, Xiankai4,5; Yang, Yunfeng6; Hartley, Iain P.3; Zhang, Wei4,5; Mo, Jiangming4,5; Yu, Guirui2; Zhou, Jizhong6,7,8,9; Kuzyakov, Yakov10,11
2019-08-01
Source PublicationGLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
ISSN1354-1013
Pages15
Corresponding AuthorMo, Jiangming(mojm@scib.ac.cn) ; Yu, Guirui(yugr@igsnrr.ac.cn)
AbstractNitrogen (N) deposition is a component of global change that has considerable impact on belowground carbon (C) dynamics. Plant growth stimulation and alterations of fungal community composition and functions are the main mechanisms driving soil C gains following N deposition in N-limited temperate forests. In N-rich tropical forests, however, N deposition generally has minor effects on plant growth; consequently, C storage in soil may strongly depend on the microbial processes that drive litter and soil organic matter decomposition. Here, we investigated how microbial functions in old-growth tropical forest soil responded to 13 years of N addition at four rates: 0 (Control), 50 (Low-N), 100 (Medium-N), and 150 (High-N) kg N ha(-1) year(-1). Soil organic carbon (SOC) content increased under High-N, corresponding to a 33% decrease in CO2 efflux, and reductions in relative abundances of bacteria as well as genes responsible for cellulose and chitin degradation. A 113% increase in N2O emission was positively correlated with soil acidification and an increase in the relative abundances of denitrification genes (narG and norB). Soil acidification induced by N addition decreased available P concentrations, and was associated with reductions in the relative abundance of phytase. The decreased relative abundance of bacteria and key functional gene groups for C degradation were related to slower SOC decomposition, indicating the key mechanisms driving SOC accumulation in the tropical forest soil subjected to High-N addition. However, changes in microbial functional groups associated with N and P cycling led to coincidentally large increases in N2O emissions, and exacerbated soil P deficiency. These two factors partially offset the perceived beneficial effects of N addition on SOC storage in tropical forest soils. These findings suggest a potential to incorporate microbial community and functions into Earth system models considering their effects on greenhouse gas emission, biogeochemical processes, and biodiversity of tropical ecosystems.
Keywordbiogeochemical cycling C and N turnover global climate change microbial functional community N deposition tropical forest
DOI10.1111/gcb.14750
WOS KeywordN DEPOSITION ; PHOSPHORUS LIMITATION ; COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ; GLOBAL CHANGE ; LAND-USE ; RESPONSES ; FUNGAL ; BACTERIAL ; BIOMASS ; DENITRIFICATION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[31770560] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41571130041] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41731176] ; National Key R&D Program of China[2017YFA0604803] ; Youth Innovation Research[LENOM2016Q0004]
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China ; National Key R&D Program of China ; Youth Innovation Research
WOS Research AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS SubjectBiodiversity Conservation ; Ecology ; Environmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000479856800001
PublisherWILEY
Citation statistics
Cited Times:6[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/68976
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态系统综合研究中心
Corresponding AuthorMo, Jiangming; Yu, Guirui
Affiliation1.China Agr Univ, Minist Educ, Key Lab Plant Soil Interact, Coll Resources & Environm Sci,Natl Acad Agr Green, Beijing, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Ecosyst Network Observat & Modeling, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
3.Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Geog, Exeter, Devon, England
4.Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Key Lab Vegetat Restorat & Management Degraded Ec, Guangzhou 510650, Guangdong, Peoples R China
5.Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Appl Bot, Guangzhou 510650, Guangdong, Peoples R China
6.Tsinghua Univ, Sch Environm, State Key Joint Lab Environm Simulat & Pollut Con, Beijing, Peoples R China
7.Univ Oklahoma, Inst Environm Genom, Dept Microbiol & Plant Biol, Norman, OK 73019 USA
8.Univ Oklahoma, Inst Environm Genom, Sch Civil Engn & Environm Sci, Norman, OK 73019 USA
9.Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Earth & Environm Sci, Berkeley, CA USA
10.Univ Gottingen, Dept Soil Sci Temperate Ecosyst, Gottingen, Germany
11.Cent South Univ Forestry & Technol, Fac Life Sci & Technol, Changsha, Hunan, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Tian, Jing,Dungait, Jennifer A. J.,Lu, Xiankai,et al. Long-term nitrogen addition modifies microbial composition and functions for slow carbon cycling and increased sequestration in tropical forest soil[J]. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,2019:15.
APA Tian, Jing.,Dungait, Jennifer A. J..,Lu, Xiankai.,Yang, Yunfeng.,Hartley, Iain P..,...&Kuzyakov, Yakov.(2019).Long-term nitrogen addition modifies microbial composition and functions for slow carbon cycling and increased sequestration in tropical forest soil.GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,15.
MLA Tian, Jing,et al."Long-term nitrogen addition modifies microbial composition and functions for slow carbon cycling and increased sequestration in tropical forest soil".GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY (2019):15.
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