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Changes in Soil Aggregate, Carbon, and Nitrogen Storages Following the Conversion of Cropland to Alfalfa Forage Land in the Marginal Oasis of Northwest China
Su, Yong Zhong1,2; Liu, Wen Jie1,2; Yang, Rong1,2; Chang, Xue Xiang1,2
2009-06-01
Source PublicationENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Volume43Issue:6Pages:1061-1070
AbstractMaintenance of soil organic carbon (SOC) is important for sustainable use of soil resources due to the multiple effects of SOC on soil nutrient status and soil structural stability. The objective of this study was to identify the changes in soil aggregate distribution and stability, SOC, and nitrogen (N) concentrations after cropland was converted to perennial alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. Algonguin) grassland for 6 years in the marginal oasis of the middle of Hexi Corridor region, northwest China. Significant changes in the size distribution of dry-sieving aggregates and water-stable aggregates, SOC, and N concentrations occurred after the conversion from crop to alfalfa. SOC and N stocks increased by 20.2% and 18.5%, respectively, and the estimated C and N sequestration rates were 0.4 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) and 0.04 Mg N ha(-1) year(-1) following the conversion. The large aggregate (> 5 mm) was the most abundant dry aggregate size fraction in both crop and alfalfa soils, and significant difference in the distribution of dry aggregates between the two land use types occurred only in the > 5 mm aggregate fraction. The percentage of water-stable macroaggregates (> 2, 2-0.25 mm) and aggregate stability (mean weight diameter of water-stable aggregates, WMWD) were significantly higher in alfalfa soils than in crop soils. There was a significant linear relationship between total SOC concentration and aggregate parameters (mean weight diameter) for alfalfa soils, indicating that aggregate stability was closely associated with increased SOC concentration following the conversion of crops to alfalfa. The SOC and N concentrations and the C/N ratio were greatest in the > 2 mm water-stable aggregates and the smallest in the 0.25-0.05 mm aggregates in crop and alfalfa soils. For the same aggregate, SOC and N concentrations in aggregate fractions increased with increasing total SOC and N concentrations. The result showed that the conversion of annual crops to alfalfa in the marginal land with coarse-texture soils can significantly increase SOC and N stocks, and improve soil structure.
SubtypeArticle
KeywordSoil Organic Carbon Nitrogen Aggregation Land Use Change Alfalfa Northwest China
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
WOS Subject ExtendedEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS KeywordORGANIC-CARBON ; CLIMATE-CHANGE ; SEQUESTRATION ; TILLAGE ; MATTER ; AGRICULTURE ; PARTICULATE ; MANAGEMENT ; GRASSLAND ; CULTIVATION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS SubjectEnvironmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000267030200010
PublisherSPRINGER
Citation statistics
Cited Times:37[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/67938
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorSu, Yong Zhong
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Cold & Arid Reg Environm & Engn Res Inst, Lab Watershed Hydrol & Appl Ecol, Lanzhou, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Ecosyst Res Network, Linze Inland River Basin Comprehens Res Stn, Lanzhou, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Su, Yong Zhong,Liu, Wen Jie,Yang, Rong,et al. Changes in Soil Aggregate, Carbon, and Nitrogen Storages Following the Conversion of Cropland to Alfalfa Forage Land in the Marginal Oasis of Northwest China[J]. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT,2009,43(6):1061-1070.
APA Su, Yong Zhong,Liu, Wen Jie,Yang, Rong,&Chang, Xue Xiang.(2009).Changes in Soil Aggregate, Carbon, and Nitrogen Storages Following the Conversion of Cropland to Alfalfa Forage Land in the Marginal Oasis of Northwest China.ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT,43(6),1061-1070.
MLA Su, Yong Zhong,et al."Changes in Soil Aggregate, Carbon, and Nitrogen Storages Following the Conversion of Cropland to Alfalfa Forage Land in the Marginal Oasis of Northwest China".ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 43.6(2009):1061-1070.
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