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Substrate-driven microbial response: A novel mechanism contributes significantly to temperature sensitivity of N2O emissions in upland arable soil
Song, Alin1; Liang, Yongchao2; Zeng, Xibai3; Yin, Huaqun4; Xu, Duanyang5; Wang, Boren1; Wen, Shilin1; Li, Dongchu1; Fan, Fenliang1
2018-03-01
Source PublicationSOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY
ISSN0038-0717
Volume118Pages:18-26
Corresponding AuthorFan, Fenliang(fanfenliang@caas.cn)
AbstractThe mechanism by which temperature sensitivity (TS) of soil N2O emissions is increased by agricultural management with application of nitrogen fertilizer (AMN) is unclear. We hypothesized that a higher TS of N2O emission induced by AMN is the result of the faster growth of specific microorganisms in response to faster nitrogen (N) mineralization at higher temperatures. To test this hypothesis, we used reciprocal transplants to separate the contributions of abiotic and microbial components to the TS of N2O emissions in an arable soil receiving organic and inorganic fertilizers and its neighboring natural grassland soil treated with two levels of N. N2O sources were separated with acetylene, and the abundances of N2O-producing microbes were assessed by quantifying the copy numbers of the associated functional genes. Compared with natural soil, only changes in abiotic properties increased the Q(10) (the factor by which the rate increases with a 10 degrees C rise in temperature) by 105.7%, while changes in both abiotic and the microbiome increased the Q(10) by 225.2%. Higher TS of N2O emission in the arable soil induced by a microbiome shift was associated with faster N mineralization, increased proportion of nitrification-N2O emission, and faster growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at higher temperatures. Addition of ammonium nitrate further enhanced the TS of N2O emissions, the proportion of nitrification N2O emission, and the increased extent of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the soil with AMN compared to the natural grassland soil. Substrate-driven growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with higher substrate preference contributes significantly to the higher TS of N2O emission caused by AMN.
KeywordNitrous oxide Temperature sensitivity Microbial response Nitrification Denitrification Anaerobic-zone development
DOI10.1016/j.soilbio.2017.11.021
WOS KeywordAMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA ; NITROUS-OXIDE N2O ; INORGANIC FERTILIZATION ; CARBON ; COMMUNITY ; DENITRIFICATION ; NITRIFICATION ; DIVERSITY ; BACTERIA ; DECOMPOSITION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectNational Key Research and Development Program of China[2016YFD0200109] ; National Key Research and Development Program of China[2016YDF0800707] ; National Key Basic Research Program of China[2014CB441001] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41571297] ; National Nonprofit Institute Research Grant of CAAS[IARRP-2014-29] ; National Nonprofit Institute Research Grant of CAAS[IARRP-2015-20]
Funding OrganizationNational Key Research and Development Program of China ; National Key Basic Research Program of China ; National Natural Science Foundation of China ; National Nonprofit Institute Research Grant of CAAS
WOS Research AreaAgriculture
WOS SubjectSoil Science
WOS IDWOS:000428490500003
PublisherPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/57331
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorFan, Fenliang
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Agr Resources & Reg Planning, Minist Agr, Key Lab Plant Nutr & Fertilizer, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China
2.Zhejiang Univ, Key Lab Environm Remediat & Ecol Hlth, Coll Environm & Resource Sci, Minist Educ, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Environm & Sustainable Dev Agr, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China
4.Cent S Univ, Sch Minerals Proc & Bioengn, Minist Educ, Key Lab Biomet, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China
5.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Song, Alin,Liang, Yongchao,Zeng, Xibai,et al. Substrate-driven microbial response: A novel mechanism contributes significantly to temperature sensitivity of N2O emissions in upland arable soil[J]. SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY,2018,118:18-26.
APA Song, Alin.,Liang, Yongchao.,Zeng, Xibai.,Yin, Huaqun.,Xu, Duanyang.,...&Fan, Fenliang.(2018).Substrate-driven microbial response: A novel mechanism contributes significantly to temperature sensitivity of N2O emissions in upland arable soil.SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY,118,18-26.
MLA Song, Alin,et al."Substrate-driven microbial response: A novel mechanism contributes significantly to temperature sensitivity of N2O emissions in upland arable soil".SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY 118(2018):18-26.
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