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Shifts in priming partly explain impacts of long-term nitrogen input in different chemical forms on soil organic carbon storage
Song, Minghua1; Guo, Yu1,2; Yu, Feihai3; Zhang, Xianzhou1; Cao, Guangmin4; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.5
2018-09-01
Source PublicationGLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
ISSN1354-1013
Volume24Issue:9Pages:4160-4172
Corresponding AuthorSong, Minghua(songmh@igsnrr.ac.cn) ; Yu, Feihai(feihaiyu@126.com)
AbstractInput of labile organic carbon can enhance decomposition of extant soil organic carbon (SOC) through priming. We hypothesized that long-term nitrogen (N) input in different chemical forms alters SOC pools by altering priming effects associated with N-mediated changes in plants and soil microbes. The hypothesis was tested by integrating field experimental data of plants, soil microbes and two incubation experiments with soils that had experienced 10years of N enrichment with three chemical forms (ammonium, nitrate and both ammonium and nitrate) in an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau. Incubations with glucose-C-13 addition at three rates were used to quantify effects of exogenous organic carbon input on the priming of SOC. Incubations with microbial inocula extracted from soils that had experienced different long-term N treatments were conducted to detect effects of N-mediated changes in soil microbes on priming effects. We found strong evidence and a mechanistic explanation for alteration of SOC pools following 10years of N enrichment with different chemical forms. We detected significant negative priming effects both in soils collected from ammonium-addition plots and in sterilized soils inoculated with soil microbes extracted from ammonium-addition plots. In contrast, significant positive priming effects were found both in soils collected from nitrate-addition plots and in sterilized soils inoculated with soil microbes extracted from nitrate-addition plots. Meanwhile, the abundance and richness of graminoids were higher and the abundance of soil microbes was lower in ammonium-addition than in nitrate-addition plots. Our findings provide evidence that shifts toward higher graminoid abundance and changes in soil microbial abundance mediated by N chemical forms are key drivers for priming effects and SOC pool changes, thereby linking human interference with the N cycle to climate change.
Keywordalpine meadow functional groups nitrogen chemical form priming effect soil microbes soil organic carbon Tibetan Plateau
DOI10.1111/gcb.14304
WOS KeywordLITTER DECOMPOSITION RATES ; MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES ; ALPINE MEADOW ; ARCTIC TUNDRA ; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS ; SPECIES RICHNESS ; PLANT DIVERSITY ; BOREAL FOREST ; DEPOSITION ; FERTILIZATION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[41671263] ; Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW, CEP)[12CDP007] ; National key research and development program[2016YFC0501803] ; National key research and development program[2016YFC0502001]
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China ; Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW, CEP) ; National key research and development program
WOS Research AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS SubjectBiodiversity Conservation ; Ecology ; Environmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000441746900023
PublisherWILEY
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/54436
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorSong, Minghua; Yu, Feihai
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Ecosyst Network Observat & Modeling, A11,Datun Rd, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China
3.Taizhou Univ, Zhejiang Prov Key Lab Plant Evolutionary Ecol & C, Taizhou 318000, Peoples R China
4.Chinese Acad Sci, Northwest Inst Plateau Biol, Xining, Qinghai, Peoples R China
5.Vrije Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Ecol Sci, Syst Ecol, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Song, Minghua,Guo, Yu,Yu, Feihai,et al. Shifts in priming partly explain impacts of long-term nitrogen input in different chemical forms on soil organic carbon storage[J]. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,2018,24(9):4160-4172.
APA Song, Minghua,Guo, Yu,Yu, Feihai,Zhang, Xianzhou,Cao, Guangmin,&Cornelissen, Johannes H. C..(2018).Shifts in priming partly explain impacts of long-term nitrogen input in different chemical forms on soil organic carbon storage.GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,24(9),4160-4172.
MLA Song, Minghua,et al."Shifts in priming partly explain impacts of long-term nitrogen input in different chemical forms on soil organic carbon storage".GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY 24.9(2018):4160-4172.
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