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Plant biomass and soil organic carbon are main factors influencing dry-season ecosystem carbon rates in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta
Li, Yong1; Wu, Haidong1; Wang, Jinzhi1; Cui, Lijuan1; Tian, Dashuan2; Wang, Jinsong2; Zhang, Xiaodong1; Yan, Liang1; Yan, Zhongqing1; Zhang, Kerou1; Kang, Xiaoming1; Song, Bing3
2019-01-14
Source PublicationPLOS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Volume14Issue:1Pages:16
Corresponding AuthorKang, Xiaoming(xmkang@ucas.ac.cn) ; Song, Bing(songbing@ldu.edu.cn)
AbstractCoastal wetlands are considered as a significant sink of global carbon due to their tremendous organic carbon storage. Coastal CO2 and CH4 flux rates play an important role in regulating atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. However, the relative contributions of vegetation, soil properties, and spatial structure on dry-season ecosystem carbon (C) rates (net ecosystem CO2 exchange, NEE; ecosystem respiration, ER; gross ecosystem productivity, GEP; and CH4) remain unclear at a regional scale. Here, we compared dry-season ecosystem C rates, plant, and soil properties across three vegetation types from 13 locations at a regional scale in the Yellow River Delta (YRD). The results showed that the Phragmites australis stand had the greatest NEE (-1365.4 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)), ER (660.2 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)), GEP (-2025.5 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)) and acted as a CH4 source (0.27 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)), whereas the Suaeda heteroptera and Tamarix chinensis stands uptook CH4 (-0.02 to -0.12 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)). Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that plant biomass was the main factor explaining all of the investigated carbon rates (GEP, ER, NEE, and CH4); while soil organic carbon was shown to be the most important for explaining the variability in the processes of carbon release to the atmosphere, i.e., ER and CH4. Variation partitioning results showed that vegetation and soil properties played equally important roles in shaping the pattern of C rates in the YRD. These results provide a better understanding of the link between ecosystem C rates and environmental drivers, and provide a framework to predict regional-scale ecosystem C fluxes under future climate change.
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0210768
WOS KeywordGREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS ; METHANE EMISSIONS ; SALT-MARSH ; POLYGONAL TUNDRA ; CH4 EMISSIONS ; RESPIRATION ; WETLANDS ; FLUXES ; VEGETATION ; SALINITY
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectNational Key Research and Development Program of China[2017YFC0506203] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41403073] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[31770511] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41701113] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41403102]
Funding OrganizationNational Key Research and Development Program of China ; National Natural Science Foundation of China
WOS Research AreaScience & Technology - Other Topics
WOS SubjectMultidisciplinary Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000455808000047
PublisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
Citation statistics
Cited Times:1[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/50538
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorKang, Xiaoming; Song, Bing
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Forestry, Inst Wetland Res, Beijing Key Lab Wetland Serv & Restorat, Beijing, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Ecosyst Network Observat & Modeling, Beijing, Peoples R China
3.Ludong Univ, Sch Resources & Environm Engn, Yantai, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Li, Yong,Wu, Haidong,Wang, Jinzhi,et al. Plant biomass and soil organic carbon are main factors influencing dry-season ecosystem carbon rates in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta[J]. PLOS ONE,2019,14(1):16.
APA Li, Yong.,Wu, Haidong.,Wang, Jinzhi.,Cui, Lijuan.,Tian, Dashuan.,...&Song, Bing.(2019).Plant biomass and soil organic carbon are main factors influencing dry-season ecosystem carbon rates in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta.PLOS ONE,14(1),16.
MLA Li, Yong,et al."Plant biomass and soil organic carbon are main factors influencing dry-season ecosystem carbon rates in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta".PLOS ONE 14.1(2019):16.
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