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Satellite-observed vegetation stability in response to changes in climate and total water storage in Central Asia
Bai, Jie1; Shi, Hao2; Yu, Qiang2,3,4; Xie, Zunyi5; Li, Longhui6; Luo, Geping1; Jin, Ning2; Li, Jun7
2019-04-01
Source PublicationSCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
ISSN0048-9697
Volume659Pages:862-871
Corresponding AuthorShi, Hao(hzs0087@auburn.edu)
AbstractEcosystems in arid and semi-arid regions are vulnerable to climatic and anthropogenic disturbances. However, our understanding of vegetation stability (including resistance and resilience, which are the abilities of ecosystems to resist perturbations and return to pre-disturbance structure or function, respectively) in response to environmental changes in dryland ecosystems remains insufficient, particularly in the absence of large-scale observations of water availability. Here we introduced GRACE monthly total water storage anomaly (TWSA) data into an autoregressive model with remote sensed EVI, air temperature and precipitation to investigate the short-term vegetation stability and its influencing factors in Central Asia (CA) during 2003-2015. The results showed that the grid-level vegetation resilience in CA increased logarithmically as mean annual precipitation (R-2= 0.33, P < 0.05) but decreased linearly with increasing mean annual temperature (R-2= 0.41, P < 0.05). Vegetation resilience was not correlated with TWSA, due to the decoupling of TWSA with precipitation both spatially and temporally in the majority of CA. At the biome level, vegetation resilience also increased as a logarithmical function of aridity index (R-2 = 0.80, P < 0.05). Vegetation resistance to TWSA showed minor difference across biomes, while vegetation resistance to precipitation functioned as a parabolic curve along the aridity gradient (R-2= 0.59, P < 0.05). Our results suggest that accounting for the effects of total water column instead of precipitation only is critical in understanding vegetation-water relationships in drylands. The steep decrease in vegetation resilience in areas with high temperature and low water availability implies a high risk of collapse for these water-limited ecosystems if there are severe droughts. Furthermore, reduction in total water storage, induced by, e.g., large-scale extraction of surface runoff or shallow-layer groundwater for irrigation, can result in negative influences to natural biomes in dryland regions. (c) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
KeywordDrylands Resilience Resistance Remote sensing Total water storage Central Asia
DOI10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.12.418
WOS KeywordECOSYSTEM STABILITY ; POTENTIAL IMPACTS ; FUNCTIONAL TYPES ; USE EFFICIENCY ; DESERT SHRUBS ; RESILIENCE ; DROUGHT ; PRECIPITATION ; DYNAMICS ; RUNOFF
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectChinese Academy of Sciences[XDA19030301] ; Natural Science Foundation of China[41361140361] ; Natural Science Foundation of China[U1403382] ; Special-Funds of Scientific Research Programs of State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on the Loess Plateau[A314021403-C4] ; Special-Funds of Scientific Research Programs of State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on the Loess Plateau[A314021402-1703]
Funding OrganizationChinese Academy of Sciences ; Natural Science Foundation of China ; Special-Funds of Scientific Research Programs of State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on the Loess Plateau
WOS Research AreaEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS SubjectEnvironmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000457293700085
PublisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation statistics
Cited Times:1[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/49818
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorShi, Hao
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, State Key Lab Desert & Oasis Ecol, Urumqi 830011, Peoples R China
2.Northwest A&F Univ, State Key Lab Soil Eros & Dryland Farming Loess P, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, Peoples R China
3.Univ Technol Sydney, Sch Life Sci, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia
4.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Resources & Environm, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China
5.Univ Queensland, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Ctr Biodivers & Conservat Sci, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia
6.Nanjing Normal Univ, Minist Educ, Key Lab Virtual Geog Environm, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China
7.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Water Cycle & Related Land Surface Proc, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Bai, Jie,Shi, Hao,Yu, Qiang,et al. Satellite-observed vegetation stability in response to changes in climate and total water storage in Central Asia[J]. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,2019,659:862-871.
APA Bai, Jie.,Shi, Hao.,Yu, Qiang.,Xie, Zunyi.,Li, Longhui.,...&Li, Jun.(2019).Satellite-observed vegetation stability in response to changes in climate and total water storage in Central Asia.SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,659,862-871.
MLA Bai, Jie,et al."Satellite-observed vegetation stability in response to changes in climate and total water storage in Central Asia".SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 659(2019):862-871.
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