Satellite-derived vegetation indices contribute significantly to the prediction of epiphyllous liverworts
Jiang, YB; Wang, TJ; de Bie, CAJM; Skidmore, AK; Liu, XH; Song, SS; Zhang, L; Wang, J; Shao, XM
2014
Source PublicationECOLOGICAL INDICATORS
ISSN1470-160X
Volume38Pages:72-80
AbstractEpiphyllous liverworts form a special group of bryophytes that primarily grow on leaves of understory vascular plants, occurring in constantly moist and warm evergreen forest in tropical and subtropical regions. They are very sensitive to climate change and environmental pollution. Previous studies have focused largely on microhabitat preferences of epiphyllous liverworts and demonstrated the importance of climate factors such as humidity, temperature and light. However, little is known about the relationship between distribution of epiphyllous liverworts and macro-habitat factors at broad spatial scales. Here, we predicated the distribution of epiphyllous liverworts in China based on topographic and bioclimatic variables, as well as satellite-derived vegetation indices at a 1 km spatial resolution using presence-only ecological niche models. We used the Area Under the receiver operating characteristic Curve (AUC) and True Skill Statistic (TSS) to validate the models, and then used the Wilcoxon paired test to compare model performances. Furthermore, we applied the jackknife test to identify the important factors affecting predictions. Our results showed that the highest accuracy (i.e., AUC = 0.98 and TSS = 0.93) in predicting epiphyllous liverworts was achieved by the model that combined climatic and remotely sensed vegetation variables. The satellite-derived annual mean and minimum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as well as the annual mean and minimum Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) emerged as the most important predictors of distribution patterns of epiphyllous liverworts, while climatic variables such as precipitation in the wettest quarter and temperature of the coldest quarter were of ancillary importance. The significant contributions of NDVI and NDWI in defining the distribution range and spatial patterns of epiphyllous liverworts, and the strong relationship between this species and evergreen forest implies that epiphyllous liverworts may be a useful indicator for forest degradation or integrity at broad spatial scales. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
SubtypeJournal
KeywordSpecies distribution model MaxEnt Climate Vegetation Macro-habitat China
Subject AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS Subject ExtendedBiodiversity Conservation ; Environmental Sciences
WOS KeywordSPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELS ; RAIN-FOREST ; POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTION ; HABITAT FRAGMENTATION ; DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS ; TROPICAL FOREST ; CLIMATE-CHANGE ; TIME-SERIES ; SENSOR DATA ; COSTA-RICA
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000330497600009
PublisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/44574
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态网络实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Jiang, YB,Wang, TJ,de Bie, CAJM,et al. Satellite-derived vegetation indices contribute significantly to the prediction of epiphyllous liverworts[J]. ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS,2014,38:72-80.
APA Jiang, YB.,Wang, TJ.,de Bie, CAJM.,Skidmore, AK.,Liu, XH.,...&Shao, XM.(2014).Satellite-derived vegetation indices contribute significantly to the prediction of epiphyllous liverworts.ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS,38,72-80.
MLA Jiang, YB,et al."Satellite-derived vegetation indices contribute significantly to the prediction of epiphyllous liverworts".ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS 38(2014):72-80.
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