Effects of different forms of plant-derived organic matter on nitrous oxide emissions
Qiu, QY; Wu, LF; Ouyang, Z; Li, BB; Xu, YY
2016
Source PublicationENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE-PROCESSES & IMPACTS
ISSN2050-7887
Volume18Issue:7Pages:854-862
AbstractTo investigate the impact of different forms of plant-derived organic matter on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, an incubation experiment with the same rate of total nitrogen (N) application was carried out at 25 degrees C for 250 days. Soils were incorporated with maize-derived organic matter (i. e., maize residuederived dissolved organic matter and maize residues with different C/N ratios) and an inorganic N fertilizer (urea). The pattern and magnitude of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were affected by the form of N applied. Single application of maize-derived organic matter resulted in a higher N2O emission than single application of the inorganic N fertilizer or combined application of the inorganic N fertilizer and maize-derived organic matter. The positive effect of maize residue-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) addition on N2O emissions was relatively short-lived and mainly occurred at the early stage following DOM addition. In contrast, the positive effect induced by maize residue addition was more pronounced and lasted for a longer period. Single application of maize residues resulted in a substantial decrease in soil nitric nitrogen (NO3- -N), but it did not affect the production of N2O. No significant relationship between N2O emission and NO3--N and ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) suggested that the availability of soil N was not limiting the production of N2O in our study. The key factors affecting soil N2O emission were the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and metabolism quotient (qCO(2)). Both of them could explain 87% of the variation in cumulative N2O emission. The C/N ratio of maizederived organic matter was a poor predictor of N2O emission when the soil was not limited by easily available C and the available N content met the microbial N demands for nitrification and denitrification. The results suggested that the magnitude of N2O emission was determined by the impact of organic amendments on soil C availability and microbial activity rather than on soil N availability. In agricultural management practices, if the N inputs from organic and inorganic N fertilizers are equivalent, addition of organic N fertilizers that contain high amounts of available C will result in a higher N2O emission.
SubtypeJournal
Subject AreaChemistry ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS Subject ExtendedChemistry, Analytical ; Environmental Sciences
WOS KeywordN2O EMISSIONS ; CROP RESIDUES ; SOIL ; CARBON ; DENITRIFICATION ; CHINA ; FERTILIZER ; QUALITY ; SYSTEMS ; MANURE
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000379941100009
PublisherROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY
Citation statistics
Cited Times:4[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/44305
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态网络实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Qiu, QY,Wu, LF,Ouyang, Z,et al. Effects of different forms of plant-derived organic matter on nitrous oxide emissions[J]. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE-PROCESSES & IMPACTS,2016,18(7):854-862.
APA Qiu, QY,Wu, LF,Ouyang, Z,Li, BB,&Xu, YY.(2016).Effects of different forms of plant-derived organic matter on nitrous oxide emissions.ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE-PROCESSES & IMPACTS,18(7),854-862.
MLA Qiu, QY,et al."Effects of different forms of plant-derived organic matter on nitrous oxide emissions".ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE-PROCESSES & IMPACTS 18.7(2016):854-862.
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