Shifting Impacts of Climate Change: Long-Term Patterns of Plant Response to Elevated CO2, Drought, and Warming Across Ecosystems
Andresen, LC; Muller, C; de Dato, G; Dukes, JS; Emmett, BA; Estiarte, M; Jentsch, A; Kroel-Dulay, G; Luscher, A; Niu, S; Penuelas, J; Reich, PB; Reinschk, S; Ogaya, R; Schmidt, IK; Schneider, MK; Sternberg, M; Tietema, A; Zhu, K; Bilton, MC
2016
Source PublicationADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 55: LARGE-SCALE ECOLOGY: MODEL SYSTEMS TO GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES
ISSN0065-2504
Volume55Pages:437-473
AbstractField experiments that expose terrestrial ecosystems to climate change factors by manipulations are expensive to maintain, and typically only last a few years. Plant biomass is commonly used to assess responses to climate treatments and to predict climate change impacts. However, response to the treatments might be considerably different between the early years and a decade later. The aim of this data analysis was to develop and apply a method for evaluating changes in plant biomass responses through time, in order to provide a firm basis for discussing how the 'short-term' response might differ from the 'long-term' response. Across 22 sites situated in the northern hemisphere, which covered three continents, and multiple ecosystems (grasslands, shrublands, moorlands, forests, and deserts), we evaluated biomass datasets from long-term experiments with exposure to elevated CO2 (eCO(2)), warming, or drought. We developed methods for assessing biomass response patterns to the manipulations using polynomial and linear (piecewise) model analysis and linked the responses to site-specific variables such as temperature and rainfall. Polynomial patterns across sites indicated changes in response direction over time under eCO(2), warming, and drought. In addition, five distinct pattern types were confirmed within sites: 'no response', 'delayed response', 'directional response', 'dampening response', and 'altered response' patterns. We found that biomass response direction was as likely to change over time as it was to be consistent, and therefore suggest that climate manipulation experiments should be carried out over timescales covering both short- and long-term responses, in order to realistically assess future impacts of climate change.
SubtypeJournal
Subject AreaEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS Subject ExtendedEcology
WOS KeywordPROGRESSIVE NITROGEN LIMITATION ; TERRESTRIAL CARBON-CYCLE ; MEDITERRANEAN SHRUBLAND ; PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY ; COMMUNITY RESPONSE ; GRASSLAND ; SOIL ; GROWTH ; PRECIPITATION ; DIVERSITY
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000399647700010
PublisherELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC
Citation statistics
Cited Times:13[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/44300
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态网络实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Andresen, LC,Muller, C,de Dato, G,et al. Shifting Impacts of Climate Change: Long-Term Patterns of Plant Response to Elevated CO2, Drought, and Warming Across Ecosystems[J]. ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 55: LARGE-SCALE ECOLOGY: MODEL SYSTEMS TO GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES,2016,55:437-473.
APA Andresen, LC.,Muller, C.,de Dato, G.,Dukes, JS.,Emmett, BA.,...&Bilton, MC.(2016).Shifting Impacts of Climate Change: Long-Term Patterns of Plant Response to Elevated CO2, Drought, and Warming Across Ecosystems.ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 55: LARGE-SCALE ECOLOGY: MODEL SYSTEMS TO GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES,55,437-473.
MLA Andresen, LC,et al."Shifting Impacts of Climate Change: Long-Term Patterns of Plant Response to Elevated CO2, Drought, and Warming Across Ecosystems".ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 55: LARGE-SCALE ECOLOGY: MODEL SYSTEMS TO GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES 55(2016):437-473.
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Andresen, LC]'s Articles
[Muller, C]'s Articles
[de Dato, G]'s Articles
Baidu academic
Similar articles in Baidu academic
[Andresen, LC]'s Articles
[Muller, C]'s Articles
[de Dato, G]'s Articles
Bing Scholar
Similar articles in Bing Scholar
[Andresen, LC]'s Articles
[Muller, C]'s Articles
[de Dato, G]'s Articles
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.