Increased precipitation has stronger effects on plant production of an alpine meadow than does experimental warming in the Northern Tibetan Plateau
Fu, G; Shen, ZX; Zhang, XZ
2018
Source PublicationAGRICULTURAL AND FOREST METEOROLOGY
ISSN0168-1923
Volume249Pages:11-21
AbstractThe Tibetan Plateau is overall getting warmer and wetter, whereas the relative responses of plant growth to warming and increased precipitation are not fully understood. Therefore, a field warming (control, low- and high-level) and increased precipitation (control, low- and high-level) experiment was conducted to compare the relative effects of warming and increased precipitation on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and gross primary production (GPP) in an alpine meadow in the Northern Tibetan Plateau since June 2014. The low- and high-level experimental warming significantly decreased soil moisture (SM) by 0.02 m(3) m(-3) and 0.04 m(3) m(-3), but significantly increased air temperature (T-alpha) by 1.91 degrees C and 3.51 degrees C, respectively, across the three growing seasons in 2014-2016. The low- and high-level warming did not significantly affect NDVI, SAVI, AGB and GPP across the three growing seasons in 2014-2016. The low- and high-level increased precipitation did not significantly affect To, but significantly increased SM by 0.02 m(3) M-3 and 0.03 m(3) m(-3), respectively, across the three growing seasons in 2014-2016. The high-level increased precipitation significantly increased NDVI by 18.7%, SAVI by 18.4%, AGB by 11.4% and GPP by 25.0%, whereas the low-level increased precipitation only tended to increase NDVI by 9.8%, SAW by 8.2%, AGB by 6.2% and GPP by 12.9%. Therefore, increased precipitation had stronger effects on NDVI, SAVI, AGB and GPP than did experimental warming in this alpine meadow site of the Northern Tibetan Plateau.
SubtypeJournal
KeywordNormalized difference vegetation index Soil-adjusted vegetation index Gross primary production Aboveground biomass Climatic change Alpine grassland
Subject AreaAgriculture ; Forestry ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
WOS Subject ExtendedAgronomy ; Forestry ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
WOS KeywordNET PRIMARY PRODUCTION ; MIXED-GRASS PRAIRIE ; SOIL RESPIRATION ; CLIMATE-CHANGE ; REPRODUCTIVE PHENOLOGY ; DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSE ; ALTITUDINAL GRADIENT ; SUMMER RAIN ; CARBON ; TEMPERATURE
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000424180100002
PublisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation statistics
Cited Times:10[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/43920
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态网络实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Fu, G,Shen, ZX,Zhang, XZ. Increased precipitation has stronger effects on plant production of an alpine meadow than does experimental warming in the Northern Tibetan Plateau[J]. AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST METEOROLOGY,2018,249:11-21.
APA Fu, G,Shen, ZX,&Zhang, XZ.(2018).Increased precipitation has stronger effects on plant production of an alpine meadow than does experimental warming in the Northern Tibetan Plateau.AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST METEOROLOGY,249,11-21.
MLA Fu, G,et al."Increased precipitation has stronger effects on plant production of an alpine meadow than does experimental warming in the Northern Tibetan Plateau".AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST METEOROLOGY 249(2018):11-21.
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