Large soil organic carbon increase due to improved agronomic management in the North China Plain from 1980s to 2010s
Han, D; Wiesmeier, M; Conant, RT; Kuehnel, A; Sun, ZG; Koegel-Knabner, I; Hou, RX; Cong, PF; Liang, RB; Ouyang, Z
2018
Source PublicationGLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
ISSN1354-1013
Volume24Issue:3Pages:987-1000
AbstractAgricultural soils are widely recognized to be capable of carbon sequestration that contributes to mitigating CO2 emissions. To better understand soil organic carbon (SOC) stock dynamics and its driving and controlling factors corresponding with a period of rapid agronomic evolution from the 1980s to the 2010s in the North China Plain (NCP), we collected data from two region-wide soil sampling campaigns (in the 1980s and 2010s) and conducted an analysis of the controlling factors using the random forest model. Between the 1980s and 2010s, environmental (i.e. soil salinity/fertility) and societal (i.e. policy/techniques) factors both contributed to adoption of new management practices (i.e. chemical fertilizer application/mechanization). Results of our work indicate that SOC stocks in the NCP croplands increased significantly, which also closely related to soil total nitrogen changes. Samples collected near the surface (0-20 cm) and deeper (20-40 cm) both increased by an average of 9.4 and 5.1 Mg C ha(-1), respectively, which are equivalent to increases of 73% and 56% compared with initial SOC stocks in the 1980s. The annual carbon sequestration amount in surface soils reached 10.9 TgC year(-1), which contributed an estimated 43% of total carbon sequestration in all of China's cropland on just 27% of its area. Successful desalinization and the subsequent increases in carbon (C) inputs, induced by agricultural projects and policies intended to support crop production (i.e. reconstruction of low yield farmland, and agricultural subsidies), combined with improved cultivation practices (i.e. fertilization and straw return) since the early 1980s were the main drivers for the SOC stock increase. This study suggests that rehabilitation of NCP soils to reduce salinity and increase crop yields have also served as a pathway for substantial soil C sequestration.
SubtypeJournal
Keywordagricultural policies improved cultivation N stock change Random Forest soil organic carbon stock change
Subject AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS Subject ExtendedBiodiversity Conservation ; Ecology ; Environmental Sciences
WOS KeywordVERTICAL-DISTRIBUTION ; RANDOM FORESTS ; CLIMATE-CHANGE ; DYNAMICS ; STORAGE ; SEQUESTRATION ; CROPLANDS ; NITROGEN ; IMPACTS ; STOCKS
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000425396700012
PublisherWILEY
Citation statistics
Cited Times:11[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/43913
Collection生态系统网络观测与模拟院重点实验室_生态网络实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Han, D,Wiesmeier, M,Conant, RT,et al. Large soil organic carbon increase due to improved agronomic management in the North China Plain from 1980s to 2010s[J]. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,2018,24(3):987-1000.
APA Han, D.,Wiesmeier, M.,Conant, RT.,Kuehnel, A.,Sun, ZG.,...&Ouyang, Z.(2018).Large soil organic carbon increase due to improved agronomic management in the North China Plain from 1980s to 2010s.GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,24(3),987-1000.
MLA Han, D,et al."Large soil organic carbon increase due to improved agronomic management in the North China Plain from 1980s to 2010s".GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY 24.3(2018):987-1000.
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