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Climatic and edaphic controls over the elevational pattern of microbial necromass in subtropical forests
Mou, Zhijian1,2,3; Kuang, Luhui1,2,3; He, Lingfeng1,2,3; Zhang, Jing1,2; Zhang, Xinyu3,4; Hui, Dafeng5; Li, Yue1,2; Wu, Wenjia1,2; Mei, Qiming1,2; He, Xianjin6; Kuang, Yuanwen1,2; Wang, Jun1,2; Wang, Yunqiang7; Lambers, Hans8; Sardans, Jordi9,10; Penuelas, Josep9,10; Liu, Zhanfeng1,2
2021-12-01
Source PublicationCATENA
ISSN0341-8162
Volume207Pages:10
Corresponding AuthorLiu, Zhanfeng(liuzf@scbg.ac.cn)
AbstractThe sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in terrestrial ecosystems is determined by the balance between plant- and microbial-derived carbon inputs and losses through soil respiration. However, a consensus on the elevational patterns of soil microbial necromass and its contribution to SOC is rare, and the information on how climatic and edaphic factors affect the accumulation of microbial necromass remains limited. In this study, soil samples were collected with a 50-m interval along an elevational gradient (200-950 m above sea level) to investigate the effects of climatic and edaphic variability associated with elevation and season on microbial necromass in subtropical forests. The concentration of soil amino sugar was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize soil microbial necromass. Partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM) was used for testing climatic and edaphic controls over the elevational pattern of microbial necromass. The concentration of soil microbial necromass and its contribution to SOC were affected by elevation and season, with lower concentration and contribution in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil microbial necromass linearly increased or followed a quadratic pattern with elevation, and accounted for 18.9% of SOC on average with a greater contribution from fungal necromass (13.2%) than from bacterial necromass (5.7%). Soil temperature, soil nitrogen and moisture content directly influenced the accumulation of soil microbial necromass with varied effects on fungal and bacterial necromass. Warmer and nutrient-impoverished environments were linked with the depletion of fungal necromass, whereas higher soil moisture and nutrient availability were positively associated with the accumulation of bacterial necromass. Our findings demonstrate that less microbial necromass, especially fungal necromass will accumulate in SOC in response to future climate warming in subtropical forests. Such information is valuable for improving our understanding of the potential impacts of future climatic change on soil carbon cycling in subtropical regions.
KeywordAmino sugars Climatic variation Edaphic properties Elevational gradient Microbial necromass carbon Subtropical forests
DOI10.1016/j.catena.2021.105707
WOS KeywordSOIL ORGANIC-MATTER ; AMINO-SUGARS ; CARBON ACCUMULATION ; RESIDUES ; FUNGAL ; DECOMPOSITION ; RESPONSES ; BIOMASS ; PLANT ; COMMUNITIES
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectStrategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences[XDA13020601] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41771278] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41571249] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[U1701246] ; Biological Resources Service Network Initiative of Chinese Academy of Sciences[ZSSD-007] ; Open Foundation of the State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology[SKLLQG1917] ; Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences ; US National Science Foundation (NSF) ; European Research Council Synergy grant[ERC-SyG-2013-610028 IMBALANCE-P]
Funding OrganizationStrategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences ; National Natural Science Foundation of China ; Biological Resources Service Network Initiative of Chinese Academy of Sciences ; Open Foundation of the State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology ; Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences ; US National Science Foundation (NSF) ; European Research Council Synergy grant
WOS Research AreaGeology ; Agriculture ; Water Resources
WOS SubjectGeosciences, Multidisciplinary ; Soil Science ; Water Resources
WOS IDWOS:000703268900120
PublisherELSEVIER
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/165870
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorLiu, Zhanfeng
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Key Lab Vegetat Restorat & Management Degraded Ec, South China Bot Garden, Guangzhou 510650, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, CAS Engn Lab Vegetat Ecosyst Restorat Isl & Coast, Guangzhou 510650, Peoples R China
3.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Resources & Environm, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China
4.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Ecosyst Network Observat & Modeling, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
5.Tennessee State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Nashville, TN 37209 USA
6.Chongqing Univ, Key Lab Three Gorges Reservoir Reg Ecoenvironm, Minist Educ, Chongqing 400045, Peoples R China
7.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Earth Environm, China State Key Lab Loess & Quaternary Geol, Xian 710061, Peoples R China
8.Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
9.CSIC, Global Ecol Unit CREAF CEAB UAB, Cerdanyola Del Valles 08193, Catalonia, Spain
10.CREAF, Cerdanyola Del Valles 08193, Catalonia, Spain
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Mou, Zhijian,Kuang, Luhui,He, Lingfeng,et al. Climatic and edaphic controls over the elevational pattern of microbial necromass in subtropical forests[J]. CATENA,2021,207:10.
APA Mou, Zhijian.,Kuang, Luhui.,He, Lingfeng.,Zhang, Jing.,Zhang, Xinyu.,...&Liu, Zhanfeng.(2021).Climatic and edaphic controls over the elevational pattern of microbial necromass in subtropical forests.CATENA,207,10.
MLA Mou, Zhijian,et al."Climatic and edaphic controls over the elevational pattern of microbial necromass in subtropical forests".CATENA 207(2021):10.
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