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Evaluating Carbon Monoxide and Aerosol Optical Depth Simulations from CAM-Chem Using Satellite Observations
Alvim, Debora Souza1,2; Chiquetto, Julio Barboza3; D'Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira4; Khalid, Bushra5,6,7; Herdies, Dirceu Luis1; Pendharkar, Jayant1; Correa, Sergio Machado8; Figueroa, Silvio Nilo1; Frassoni, Ariane1; Capistrano, Vinicius Buscioli9; Boian, Claudia10; Kubota, Paulo Yoshio1; Nobre, Paulo1
2021-06-01
Source PublicationREMOTE SENSING
Volume13Issue:11Pages:36
Corresponding AuthorAlvim, Debora Souza(debora.alvim@inpe.br)
AbstractThe scope of this work was to evaluate simulated carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the CAM-chem model against observed satellite data and additionally explore the empirical relationship of CO, AOD and fire radiative power (FRP). The simulated seasonal global concentrations of CO and AOD were compared, respectively, with the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite products for the period 2010-2014. The CAM-chem simulations were performed with two configurations: (A) tropospheric-only; and (B) tropospheric with stratospheric chemistry. Our results show that the spatial and seasonal distributions of CO and AOD were reasonably reproduced in both model configurations, except over central China, central Africa and equatorial regions of the Atlantic and Western Pacific, where CO was overestimated by 10-50 ppb. In configuration B, the positive CO bias was significantly reduced due to the inclusion of dry deposition, which was not present in the model configuration A. There was greater CO loss due to the chemical reactions, and shorter lifetime of the species with stratospheric chemistry. In summary, the model has difficulty in capturing the exact location of the maxima of the seasonal AOD distributions in both configurations. The AOD was overestimated by 0.1 to 0.25 over desert regions of Africa, the Middle East and Asia in both configurations, but the positive bias was even higher in the version with added stratospheric chemistry. By contrast, the AOD was underestimated over regions associated with anthropogenic activity, such as eastern China and northern India. Concerning the correlations between CO, AOD and FRP, high CO is found during March-April-May (MAM) in the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in China. In the Southern Hemisphere, high CO, AOD, and FRP values were found during August-September-October (ASO) due to fires, mostly in South America and South Africa. In South America, high AOD levels were observed over subtropical Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia. Sparsely urbanized regions showed higher correlations between CO and FRP (0.7-0.9), particularly in tropical areas, such as the western Amazon region. There was a high correlation between CO and aerosols from biomass burning at the transition between the forest and savanna environments over eastern and central Africa. It was also possible to observe the transport of these pollutants from the African continent to the Brazilian coast. High correlations between CO and AOD were found over southeastern Asian countries, and correlations between FRP and AOD (0.5-0.8) were found over higher latitude regions such as Canada and Siberia as well as in tropical areas. Higher correlations between CO and FRP are observed in Savanna and Tropical forests (South America, Central America, Africa, Australia, and Southeast Asia) than FRP x AOD. In contrast, boreal forests in Russia, particularly in Siberia, show a higher FRP x AOD correlation than FRP x CO. In tropical forests, CO production is likely favored over aerosol, while in temperate forests, aerosol production is more than CO compared to tropical forests. On the east coast of the United States, the eastern border of the USA with Canada, eastern China, on the border between China, Russia, and Mongolia, and the border between North India and China, there is a high correlation of CO x AOD and a low correlation between FRP with both CO and AOD. Therefore, such emissions in these regions are not generated by forest fires but by industries and vehicular emissions since these are densely populated regions.
Keywordcarbon monoxide aerosol optical depth FRP MOPITT MODIS CAM-chem
DOI10.3390/rs13112231
WOS KeywordCOMMUNITY ATMOSPHERE MODEL ; CHEMISTRY-CLIMATE MODEL ; AIR-QUALITY ; DATA ASSIMILATION ; FOREST-FIRES ; EMISSIONS ; SYSTEM ; CO ; VALIDATION ; PRODUCTS
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectAgencia Nacional de aguas (ANA) ; Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento de Pessoal de Nivel Superior (CAPES) (National Water Agency (ANA)) ; Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES)[88887.115872/2015-01] ; project Development of the Brazilian Earth System Model-BESM and Generation of Climate Change Scenarios, Looking For Studies of Impacts on Water Resources[2785/2015] ; CAPES[88887.371883/2019-00] ; CAPES[88881.148662/2017-01]
Funding OrganizationAgencia Nacional de aguas (ANA) ; Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento de Pessoal de Nivel Superior (CAPES) (National Water Agency (ANA)) ; Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) ; project Development of the Brazilian Earth System Model-BESM and Generation of Climate Change Scenarios, Looking For Studies of Impacts on Water Resources ; CAPES
WOS Research AreaEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology ; Geology ; Remote Sensing ; Imaging Science & Photographic Technology
WOS SubjectEnvironmental Sciences ; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary ; Remote Sensing ; Imaging Science & Photographic Technology
WOS IDWOS:000660623500001
PublisherMDPI
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/164024
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorAlvim, Debora Souza
Affiliation1.Natl Inst Space Res INPE, Ctr Weather Forecasting & Climate Studies CPTEC, BR-12630000 Cachoeira Paulista, SP, Brazil
2.Univ Sao Paulo, Lorena Sch Engn EEL, BR-05508050 Lorena, SP, Brazil
3.Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Adv Studies, BR-05508050 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
4.Univ Sao Francisco USF, Res Grp Environm & Sustainabil GPMAS, BR-13250400 Itatiba, SP, Brazil
5.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
6.Int Islamic Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
7.Abdus Salam Int Ctr Theoret Phys, Earth Syst Phys, I-34151 Trieste, Italy
8.Univ Estado Rio De Janeiro, Fac Technol, BR-27537000 Resende, RJ, Brazil
9.Univ Fed Mato Grosso do Sul, Inst Phys, BR-79070900 Campo Grande, MS, Brazil
10.Fed Univ ABC UFABC, Ctr Engn Modeling & Appl Social Sci CECS, BR-09210580 Santo Andre, SP, Brazil
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Alvim, Debora Souza,Chiquetto, Julio Barboza,D'Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira,et al. Evaluating Carbon Monoxide and Aerosol Optical Depth Simulations from CAM-Chem Using Satellite Observations[J]. REMOTE SENSING,2021,13(11):36.
APA Alvim, Debora Souza.,Chiquetto, Julio Barboza.,D'Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira.,Khalid, Bushra.,Herdies, Dirceu Luis.,...&Nobre, Paulo.(2021).Evaluating Carbon Monoxide and Aerosol Optical Depth Simulations from CAM-Chem Using Satellite Observations.REMOTE SENSING,13(11),36.
MLA Alvim, Debora Souza,et al."Evaluating Carbon Monoxide and Aerosol Optical Depth Simulations from CAM-Chem Using Satellite Observations".REMOTE SENSING 13.11(2021):36.
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