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Contribution of soil microbial necromass to SOC stocks during vegetation recovery in a subtropical karst ecosystem
Guo, Zhiming1,2; Zhang, Xinyu1,2; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.3,4; Green, Sophie M.3; Wen, Xuefa1,2; Quine, Timothy A.3
2021-03-20
Source PublicationSCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
ISSN0048-9697
Volume761Pages:9
Corresponding AuthorZhang, Xinyu(zhangxy@igsnrr.ac.cn)
AbstractCarbon sequestration is a key soil function, and an increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) is an indicator of ecosystem recovery because it underpins other ecosystem services by acting as a substrate for the soil microbial community. The soil microbial community constitutes the active pool of SOC, and its necromass (microbial residue carbon, MRC) contributes strongly to the stable SOC pool. Therefore, we propose that the potential for restoration of degraded karst ecosystems lies in the abundance of soil microbial community and the persistence of its necromass, and may be measured by changes in its contribution to the active and stable SOC pools during recovery. We investigated changes in SOC stocks using an established space-for-time chronosequence along a perturbation gradient in the subtropical karst ecosystem: sloping cropland < abandoned cropland < shrubland < secondary forest < primary forest. Microbial biomarkers were extracted from soil profiles from surface to bedrock and used to measure the contributions of the soil microbial community composition (using phospholipid fatty acids, PLFAs) and MRC (using amino sugars) to SOC stocks at each recovery stage. The results showed that the SOC stocks ranged from 10.53 to 31.77 kg m(-2) and increased with recovery stage, with total MRC accounting for 17-28% of SOC. Increasing PLFAs and MRC abundances were positively correlated with improved soil structure (decreased bulk density) and organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient. Bacterial MRC contributes more to SOC stocks than fungal residue carbon during vegetation recovery. The PLFA analysis indicated that Gram positive bacteria were the largest microbial group and were relatively more abundant in deeper soils, and biomarkers for saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal fungi were more abundant in soils under woody vegetation. In conclusion, this study suggests that the soil microbial community in karst soils have the potential to adapt to changing soil conditions and contribute substantially to building SOC stocks after abandonment of agriculture in degraded karst landscapes. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
KeywordMicrobial residue carbon Phospholipid fatty acid Cropland Shrubland Forest Soil degradation Karst Critical Zone
DOI10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.143945
WOS KeywordORGANIC-MATTER ; BACTERIAL RESIDUES ; COMMUNITY COMPOSITION ; TRACE CONCENTRATIONS ; STABLE-ISOTOPES ; AMINO-SUGARS ; CARBON ; FUNGAL ; ACCUMULATION ; FOREST
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding ProjectNational Key Research and Development Program of China[2017YFC0503904] ; Science Centre Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China[31988102] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41877091] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41830860] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41571130043] ; National Environmental Research Council of the UK[NE/N007603/1]
Funding OrganizationNational Key Research and Development Program of China ; Science Centre Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China ; National Natural Science Foundation of China ; National Environmental Research Council of the UK
WOS Research AreaEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS SubjectEnvironmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000607780900121
PublisherELSEVIER
Citation statistics
Cited Times:1[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.igsnrr.ac.cn/handle/311030/136321
Collection中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所
Corresponding AuthorZhang, Xinyu
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Key Lab Ecosyst Network Observat & Modeling, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Resources & Environm, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China
3.Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Geog, Rennes Dr, Exeter EX4 4RJ, Devon, England
4.Rothamsted Res, Sustainable Agr Sci, Okehampton EX20 2SB, Devon, England
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Guo, Zhiming,Zhang, Xinyu,Dungait, Jennifer A. J.,et al. Contribution of soil microbial necromass to SOC stocks during vegetation recovery in a subtropical karst ecosystem[J]. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,2021,761:9.
APA Guo, Zhiming,Zhang, Xinyu,Dungait, Jennifer A. J.,Green, Sophie M.,Wen, Xuefa,&Quine, Timothy A..(2021).Contribution of soil microbial necromass to SOC stocks during vegetation recovery in a subtropical karst ecosystem.SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT,761,9.
MLA Guo, Zhiming,et al."Contribution of soil microbial necromass to SOC stocks during vegetation recovery in a subtropical karst ecosystem".SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 761(2021):9.
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